miércoles, 29 de marzo de 2017

18th Dynasty columns

18th Dynasty columns
As indicated by isolated cartouches, these three 18th Dynasty columns were made for Tuthmosis IV. Some twohundred years later, they were usurped by Merenptah and Sethos II, and most of the cartouches name these kings. Much later, the columns were reused in the construction of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, where they now serve as supporting elements in rooms I and V.
Present location KUNSTHISTORISCHES MUSEUM [09/001] VIENNA
Inventory number ohne Nummer
Dating TUTHMOSIS IV/MENKHEPERURE
Archaeological Site ALEXANDRIA
Category COLUMN/PILLAR
Material GRANITE
Technique HEWN
Height 630 cm
Diameter 110 cm
globalegyptianmuseum.org
Bibliography•Satzinger, H., Das Kunsthistorische Museum in Wien: die Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung. (Antike Welt, 25. Jahrgang, Sondernummer.) Mainz: Philipp von Zabern, 1994, 49, Abb. 31.

Head of a woman (sculptor's model)

Head of a woman (sculptor's model)
This nearly square, flat piece of white limestone has been carved in raised relief, showing a woman's head facing left. The lady is represented with a large wig, of which the tresses and braids have been rendered with great precision and regularity. Upon her forehead is a decorated band and on top of her head is a lotus in full bloom. The edge of the wig is marked by a braid, and an earring shaped as a disk appears from underneath it. The delicate profile shows a nose with a slight curve and a slightly protruding lower lip. The eye and brow are marked by raised lines of eye-paint in the Egyptian fashion. The incised line between the eye and the brow is a remarkable feature. Below the eye is a series of vertical lines which have been flatly incised in an irregular manner. Presumably, this playful addition was added at a later date inspired by the hieroglyph of the tearing eye. The front of the neck is marked by three stylized parallel horizontal folds. The upper right corner has the remains of a border in the form of a small raised edge.
Present location KUNSTHISTORISCHES MUSEUM [09/001] VIENNA
Inventory number 73
Dating SETHOS I/MENMAATRE ?
Archaeological Site UNKNOWN
Category SCULPTOR'S MODEL
Material LIMESTONE
Technique HEWN
Height 22.6 cm
Width 25.6 cm
Depth 4.4 cm
globalegyptianmuseum.org
Bibliography•Verzeichnis der antiken Sculpturenwerke, Inschriften und Mosaiken des K.k. Münz- und Antikencabinets im unteren K.k. Belvedere (1826) 23, Nr. 2.
•Übersicht der ägyptischen Alterthümer des k.k. Münz- und Antiken-Cabinetes (7. verm. Aufl. 1872) 24/Nr. 54.
•Kunsthistorisches Museum (KHM). Führer durch die Sammlungen. Wien. 1988.
•Satzinger, H., Das Kunsthistorische Museum in Wien. Die Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung. Zaberns Bildbände zur Archäologie 14. Mainz. 1994.

Model of a ship

Models of ships were placed in the tomb in order to enable the deceased to travel freely in the afterlife. Kings were even provided with genuine ships. We must not forget that ships were the principal means of transportation in ancient Egypt. Other models of ships depict the transportation of the mummy to the necropolis. The model shown here is a well-made model of a luxury travelling ship. The prow and stern rise up steeply and their extremities are shaped like lotus flowers. The cabin is an open kiosk where a married couple is sitting at a table laden with food. The ship's crew is now missing its oars, and it is possible that these figures do not originally belong to the model.

Present location

KUNSTHISTORISCHES MUSEUM [09/001] VIENNA

Inventory number

3923

Dating

12TH DYNASTY ?

Archaeological Site

UNKNOWN

Category

BOAT (MODEL)

Material

WOOD

Technique

SCULPTURED

Height

20.1 cm

Width

10.2 cm

Bibliography

  • Komorzynski, E., Über Fälschungen auf dem Gebiet der ägyptischen Alterumskunde, in: Mitteilungsblatt d. Vereines d. Bundeskriminalbeamten Österr. Nr. 57/58 (1954) 3.
  • Komorzynski, E., Falsch oder echt?, in: Hochschulzeitung vom 1. November 1956, S. 2.
  • Kunsthistorisches Museum (KHM). Führer durch die Sammlungen. Wien. 1988.
  • Satzinger, H., Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien (museum), Braunschweig (Verlag Westermann), 1987.
  • Satzinger, H., Das Kunsthistorische Museum in Wien. Die Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung. Zaberns Bildbände zur Archäologie 14. Mainz. 1994.
  • Seipel, W. (ed.), Ägypten. Götter, Gräber und die Kunst. 4000 Jahre Jenseitsglaube, Linz (1989).
  • Seipel, W. (ed.), Götter Menschen Pharaonen, Speyer (1993) = Dioses, Hombres, Faraones, Ciudad de México (1993) = Das Vermächtnis der Pharaonen, Zürich (1994).

globalegyptianmuseum.org

martes, 28 de marzo de 2017

Siptah and Tawosret―Children of an Usurper

Siptah and Tawosret―Children of an Usurper
https://www.academia.edu/31095795/Siptah_and_Tawosret_Children_of_an_Usurper

lunes, 27 de marzo de 2017

G7530-40, the double-mastaba of Meresankh III and its rock-cut chapel, G7530sub


G7530-40, the double-mastaba of Meresankh III and its rock-cut chapel, G7530sub
Meresankh, of whom the preliminary red outline sketch can still be seen, is facing to the left. Her short wig (or perhaps natural hair) extends down to the back of her neck. She is wearing a broad necklace and choker (only just visible), as well as bracelets on both wrists, and anklets. She is clothed in long white dress with broad shoulder straps, her right breast being revealed (probably to portray her femininity). Her right hand is held over her left breast. Note should be made of her aquiline nose and slightly thickened chin. Above her head is an inscription in four columns: "The king's daughter of his body, the beholder of Horus and Seth, companion of Horus, Meresankh."
The very small image of a child, standing at her feet, should also be noted.
This small boy, with red skin, and naked except for a necklace and bracelets, stands on the far side of Meresankh’s feet. Associated with this small image are two columns of inscription (in red and yellow) identifying the figure as: "The king's son of his body, Duwa-Re". Thus he is a son of Khephren (see cm-090-03). The substantial difference in size between these figures of Meresankh and the boy shown on both pillars is not unusual, even though out of proportion, and is repeated on the adjoining west wall (
However, neither the representations, nor the inscriptions, are in relief, unlike those of other secondary figures in the chapel.
G7530-40, the double-mastaba of Meresankh III and its rock-cut chapel, G7530sub
osiris,net.net

G7530-40, the double-mastaba of Meresankh III and its rock-cut chapel, G7530sub

G7530-40, the double-mastaba of Meresankh III and its rock-cut chapel, G7530sub




The queen's name is sometimes transcribed as Mersyankh, meaning "the Living One loves her". Nevertheless, the version Meresankh, "she loves life", is almost universally adopted.
• Her father was prince Kawab, eldest son of Kheops by the queen Merytytes I, to whom the mastabas G7110+20 is customarily attributed.
• Her mother was Hetepheres II, Her mother was Hetepheres II, a daughter of Kheops, who therefore married her biological brother. Four children of this couple are known: Duaenhor, Kaemsekhem, Mindjedef and Meresankh herself. Kawab should have succeeded Kheops as king, but he predeceased him. Hetepheres II was to become queen by remarriage — to her stepbrother Djedefre, who acceeded to the throne upon the death of Kheops. However, after a reign of only eight years, he died without an heir, and so the throne passed to another son of Kheops, Kephren. The transmission of power seems to have occurred without any difficulty.
Hetepheres II must have been a very important person, to whom her daughter Meresankh probably owed everything, which would explain the allusions to her all over the the chapel of her daughter.
G7530-40, the double-mastaba of Meresankh III and its rock-cut chapel, G7530sub
osirisnet.net

sábado, 25 de marzo de 2017

Terracotta figurine of the god Bes

Terracotta figurine of the god Bes
Terracotta figurine of the god Bes standing on a high trapezium-shaped base. The figure has a feathered crown, a legionary's uniform with raised sword, and a shield with a rounded border.
Present location MUSEU NACIONAL DE ARQUEOLOGIA [46/003] LISBON
Inventory number E 209 (n. cat. 272)
Dating GRAECO-ROMAN PERIOD
Archaeological Site UNKNOWN
Category HUMAN FIGURINE
Material POTTERY
Technique BURNED
Height 24 cm
Width 10 cm
http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/detail.aspx?id=11734
Bibliography•Antiguidades Egípcias I, Lisboa, 1993