martes, 24 de febrero de 2015

Model of a Scribe's Palette Inscribed for Amenhotep

Model of a Scribe's Palette Inscribed for Amenhotep

Period: New Kingdom
Dynasty: Dynasty 18
Reign: reign of Amenhotep III
Date: ca. 1390–1352 B.C.
Geography: From Egypt; Possibly from Upper Egypt; Thebes
Medium: Travertine (Egyptian alabaster)
Dimensions: L. 44.5 cm (17 1/2 in); w. 8 cm (3 1/8 in)
Credit Line: Rogers Fund, 1937
Accession Number: 37.2.1
 
 
 met museum
metmuseum.org

lunes, 23 de febrero de 2015

Bronze phallic wind chime (tintinabulum)

Bronze phallic wind chime (tintinabulum)

Roman, 1st century AD

To ward off evil spirits

Bronze wind chimes like these were hung up in gardens and porticoes where they would make a tinkling sound as the wind passed through them. Bells were believed to keep off evil spirits and so they were often combined with the phallus, an erect penis, which was also a symbol of good fortune and a charm against evil. The main phallus is portrayed with wings, and the feet and tail of an animal, perhaps a lion. These add to its protective powers.
The Greeks and Romans had none of the reservations about nudity and sexuality which in the West we have inherited from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, so the naked body and sexual images were a common part of everyday life. The phallus, used as a lucky charm, was worn as jewellery, incorporated into furniture and fittings, and was carved and painted on the walls of houses, public buildings and street corners.
C. Johns, Sex or symbol : erotic images (London, TheBritish


 British Museum
britishmuseum.org

Apotropaic wand

 Apotropaic wand


From Thebes, Egypt
Late Middle Kingdom, around 1750 BC
A magical 'knife' intended for the protection of a mother and child
Childbirth and early infancy were felt to be particularly threatening to both mother and baby. Magic played the primary role in countering these threats; various evil spirits needed to be warned off, and deities invoked to protect the vulnerable. These magic knives, also known as apotropaic (that is, acting to ward off evil) wands, were one of the devices used. They are usually made of hippopotamus ivory, thus enlisting the support of that fearsome beast against evil.
The term 'knife' is inappropriate, and the shape may be related more to the throwstick (similar to a modern boomerang). Throwsticks were used to hunt birds, and flocks of birds were seen as a symbol of chaos, hence the appropriateness of the shape.
The depictions on this knife encompass a range of protective images. They include a grotesque dwarf, probably known as Aha at this date, but later the more famous Bes, and Taweret (a pregnant hippopotamus carrying a knife), both of whom are associated with childbirth. Lions, the scarab of rebirth, serpents, and other fantastic protective demons also feature.
Archaeologists have found that many of these 'knives' seem to have been deliberately broken before being placed in the tombs. One explanation is that this was done to destroy some of the object's powers, which would have been inappropriate in the context of death and burial.
G. Pinch, Magic in Ancient Egypt (London, The British Museum Press, 1994)
S. Quirke, Ancient Egyptian religion (London, The British Museum Press, 1992)

British Museum
britishmuseum.org

CK 5 : Groupe statuaire de Pȝ-šrj-n-tȝ-jswy, ʿšȝ-jḫt et Nfrt-jj.w. Caire JE 36576

CK 5 : Groupe statuaire de Pȝ-šrj-n-tȝ-jswy, ʿšȝ-jḫt et Nfrt-jj.w. Caire JE 36576

 http://www.ifao.egnet.net/bases/cachette/?&os=4

sábado, 21 de febrero de 2015

Incised block (talatat) from an Amarna temple

Incised block (talatat) from an Amarna temple. Sunk relief depicting an Amarna princess in a musician's role and rattling the sistrum. Country of Origin: Egypt. Culture: Ancient Egyptian. Date/Period: 18th dynasty c.1352-1336 BC. Material/ Size: Limestone H=23.1 cm Credit Line: Werner Forman Archive/ Brooklyn Museum . Location: 72.

Ilustración

Anonymous - Freie Deutsche Akademie der Wissenschaften und Künste e.V. Bonn

 Ankleidungszeremonie, museales Geflecht aus Papyros
Berenice III