miércoles, 22 de abril de 2015

frage¡mento tejido

Este trozo de tela pintada pertenece a los "sudarios" o las "telas votivas" encontrados en el templo funerario de Mentuhotep II en Deir el-Bahari. La mayor parte de las telas muestran al propietario mientras presenta ofrendas a la <A HREF="God">diosa</A> Hathor. Según la iconografía que presenten, se distinguen muchas categorías. El ejemplar de Bruselas se clasifica en el grupo que presenta a la <A HREF="God>diosa</A> vaca dentro de una barca procesional. Tres pequeñas column...as de jeroglíficos, que coronan la escena, mencionan el nombre de la propietaria y de la <A HREF="God">diosa</A> local.
dinadtía XVIII
KMKG - MRAH
bibliografía
L. Speleers, Recueil des inscriptions égyptiennes des Musées Royaux du Cinquantenaire à Bruxelles, Bruxelles 1923, 46 nº 162
Van dieren en mensen. Getuigenissen uit Prehistorie en Oudheid - Des animaux et des hommes. Témoignages de la Préhistoire et de l'Antiquité (Exposition), Bruxelles 1988, 178 nº 177
G. Pinch, Votive Offerings to Hathor, Oxford 1993, 111
fuente: globalegyptianmuseum

domingo, 19 de abril de 2015

Vessel

Vessel

A large sherd of pottery, decorated with a blue pattern including lotus flowers with black outlines on a buff background.
AMARNA/AKHETATEN
XVIII dinasty

LIVERPOOL MUSEUM

source:globalegyptian

Red pottery with polished white decoration This type of vessel in terracotta, which dates from the Naqada I Period, imitates models of basketry. It is also characterised by geometric patterns identical to the small braided baskets. E 1506 NAQADA I KMKG - MRAH


Red pottery with polished white decoration
This type of vessel in terracotta, which dates from the Naqada I Period, imitates models of basketry. It is also characterised by geometric patterns identical to the small braided baskets.
E 1506

NAQADA I
KMKG - MRAH



globalegyptianmuseum
This type of vessel in terracotta, which dates from the Naqada I Period, imitates models of basketry. It is also characterised by geometric patterns identical to the small braided baskets.
E 1506

NAQADA I
KMKG - MRAH

sábado, 18 de abril de 2015

Nubian warrior in front of a chariot

Nubian warrior in front of a chariot
ostracon from Deir el Medinah
THE ROYAL MUSEUMS OF ART AND HISTORY


globalegyptianmuseum

viernes, 17 de abril de 2015

Painted plaster from the exterior of a house

From Tell el-Amarna, Egypt
18th Dynasty, around 1345 BC

From a colourful doorway

Finds of painted plaster show that Egyptian houses were originally decorated using many colours. This fragments shows that some areas, such as around the door, were moulded. This doorway was made to look like the entrance to a temple, with characteristic curved cornice with black, red and blue bands. The rounded horizontal moulding below this represents the lintel of the temple. This was made of reeds bound together with rope in ancient times, when temples were made of organic materials rather than stone. This feature was incorporated into the decoration when stone was used, and is shown here as a red zigzag pattern.

Relatively few city sites have been found in Egypt. Tell el-Amarna, ancient Akhetaten, was the capital built by Akhenaten, and occupied only during his reign. The abandoned houses, temples, palaces and administrative buildings were left standing and were gradually covered by sand. Archaeological investigation of the city has provided a great deal of information about town planning, and the construction of different types of building in the late Eighteenth Dynasty. Some houses were preserved to a height of over a metre, with staircases and emplacements for columns and granaries still intact.

T.G.H. James, Egyptian painting and drawing (London, The British Museum Press, 1985)

M. Stead, Egyptian life (London, The British Museum Press, 1986)
British Museum


britishmusum,org

Thoth, Ibys

Thoth, Ibys
Deir el Medinah
ostracon
from the Royak Museums of artsand History
source: osirisnet