domingo, 22 de mayo de 2016

The mastaba of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep




Calling this the east "wall" is a slight exaggeration because it is somewhat limited in its expanse, due to the fact that the two entrances, which connect with the preceding chamber (which are further broadened by the recesses for the doors), lie either side of it. Therefore, it consists only of the central pillar (width: 0.90m; height: 1.94m) and a lintel (height: 0.16m) extending over the pillar to the entire chamber width. The lintel was already damaged in ancient times, presumably during the late period, so that today its original decoration is no longer discernible. Only the tall image field of the pillar remains today (width: 0.78m; height: 1.14 m), and even this had to be reconstructed from single blocks scattered around the offering chamber.

This area is bordered by the conventional colour ladder. The other remaining colour at this end of the offering chamber belongs to the recesses for the two doorways. These were painted red. The recesses over the doorways, however, vanished along with that of the original lintel.
The image field shows a representation of the two deceased embracing. A similar picture is located on the opposite west wall so that a correspondence exists between these two representations.
As with the previous scene of embrace, on the other side of this pillar, Niankhkhnum stands in front of Khnumhotep and again facing north. Both deceased face each other so closely that their noses touch. Their names are drawn in vertical lines behind each of the deceased.

The mastaba of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep

osirisnet.net
 
 
 The mastaba of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep
 
 

The mastaba of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep

The mastaba of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep







The top register shows the rarely portrayed scene at the granary, in which the barley required for the scenes below is carefully measured out, precisely 58 hequat-measures. A prime example of Egyptian bureaucracy, the quantity of cereal removed is announced orally, noted by a scribe and then officially endorsed by the overseer of the warehouse.
Registers two to four are devoted to the making of two types of bread, one for consumption and one for brewing beer.
• On the rig...ht of register two, the barley is crushed by two men using long pestles, after which the corn is separated from the chaff. This is then ground and sieved by the women of the left-hand side. The woman on the right, who is sieving the flour, jokingly chides her companion, who is grinding it : "Hurry up now, white one, so that I can sieve the flour!". She then replies : "I'm doing so, as you wish", whilst she is held from behind by her son
The mastaba of Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep
osirisnet.net

sábado, 21 de mayo de 2016

Min-nakht

Min-nakht is reading the papyrus on his lap. One of the first New Kingdom sculptures of this type, Min-nakht's statue was inspired by early Middle Kingdom style, including his large, prominent ears and his wig. The inscription on the papyrus records Min-nakht's name and his title, royal scribe. On the base is an offering text.

viernes, 20 de mayo de 2016

Large Oval Storage Basket

Large Oval Storage Basket
Period:New KingdomDynasty:Dynasty 18, earlyReign:reign of Thutmose II–Early Joint reignDate:ca. 1492–1473 B.C.Geography:From Egypt, Upper Egypt, Thebes, Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, Tomb of Hatnefer and Ramose (below TT 71), MMA excavations, 1935–36Medium:Halfa grass, palm leaf, linen cordDimensions:Basket: L. 63.5 cm (25 in.); Greatest w. 40 cm (15 3/4 in.); H. 23 cm (9 1/16 in.) Lid: L. 56 cm (22 1/16 in.); W. 32 cm (12 5/8 in.); H. 4 cm (1 9/16 in.)Credit... Line:Rogers Fund, 1936
The undisturbed tomb of a woman named Hatnefer (36.3.1) was discovered by the Museum's Egyptian Expedition in 1936. This find was particularly interesting because Hatnefer was the mother of Senenmut, a well-known official of the female pharaoh Hatshepsut. Hatnefer had died in her seventies, outliving her husband, Ramose, and several other family members by many years. When his mother died, Senenmut brought the mummies of his father, three women, and four children from their previous resting place, and had them interred in Hatnefer's tomb. He provided his family with all of the things necessary for the afterlife, including baskets of food to nourish their spirits.
This oval basket has a slightly convex lid. Both are made with coils of grass that are sewn together using the same grass. A flange of two coils has been attached to the inside of the rim using strips of palm leaf. The decoration of chevrons is created with dyed grass wrapped around the coils. The basket contains various types of bread (36.3.73, .74, .78, .79), dishes of dates (36.3.64, .66) and raisins (36.3.65), dome palm nuts, and other foodstuffs (36.3.79).
Met Museum
metmuseum.org

Seated figure of the district governor of Metjen






Seated figure of the district governor of Metjen
circa 2600 BC
Medium rose granite
Current location Berlin, Neues Museum